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Six Nations Championship 2018

Centred right to left: Ireland's Mick Galway and Templeton's Justin Kelly. 
Just some of the Irishmen working hard at Twickenham on St Patrick's Day.

 

As the 124th edition of the tournament commenced, with the bonus point system still in swing, all eyes were on the team who could not only dominate the Six Nations Table but also attain the Triple Crown and Grand Slam, ensuring them an additional 3 bonus points.

Ireland had denied England the Grand Slam and Triple Crown last year. Tensions rise in the wait to see if England could go all the way this year as defending champions.

Few would have missed out on the action this year. 

At Templeton Events, we always have a Director present at all times to ensure everything is set up correctly prior to the arrival of you and your party, and to ensure the day continues to run smoothly throughout. Towards the end of the event, we ensure that nothing has been accidentally misplaced or left behind and return it safely to its rightful owner. We also provide personalised table placecards so you can plan in advance where you would like guests to sit during your lunch. Templeton Events offers consistency from one event to the next.


The results of this year’s 2018 tournament were as follows:

1. Ireland – 5W 0L – 26 points - Grand Slam and Triple Crown Winners

2. Wales – 3W 2L – 15 points

3. Scotland – 3W 2L – 13 points

4. France – 2W 3L – 11 points

5. England – 2W 3L – 10 points

6. Italy – 0W 5L – 1 point

Top try scorer this year was awarded to Ireland’s 21-year-old Jacob Stockdale, scoring 7 tries in total,
followed by Italy’s Minozzi and England’s May, who scored 4 tries each.

 

Here’s how [most of] the tournament unfolded: 

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Six Nations Championship 2017


Manu Tuilagi not playing for England at the France match at Twickenham due to injury - chatting with Templeton's Robin Mays. 

2017 Six Nations Championship was certainly a notable one
For the 123rd edition of the tournament, the 2017 Six Nations Championship was certainly a notable one. For the first time in the Six Nations, this year saw the introduction of the bonus point system in which a team scoring four or more tries in a match were awarded an additional league table point. In addition to this, a winner of a Grand Slam (all five matches) would be awarded three bonus points as so to ensure a clear Championship win. 

England had won the Grand Slam and the Triple Crown last year in 2016 – could they muster up the same strength and determination and do it again?

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Japanese Food for Dummies

 

1. Make your way over to a quality Japanese restaurant or if you're in London try Kiku.

Kiku restaurant is a contemporary Japanese restaurant on Half Moon Street in Mayfair known across London as one of the most authentic of its kind. The design of the restaurant is minimalist and dignified, a clear reflection of Japanese culture. The rooms are long and narrow, plainly furnished with light wood with rattan screens that stop it being monotonous. As we entered, the staff greeted us with a friendly welcome, allowing us to change our booking and sit at the counter for a unique view of the food preparation.

For the first few visits to Japanese restaurants, it is good to go to the more high end examples as you will be looked after very well and likely to feel comfortable about the experience. Soon you will be a natural. Being more relaxed you will enjoy the atmosphere, the subtlety of the flavours and begin to experiment with the more unusual menu choices for example sea urchin (Japanese word "Uni" pronounced oo-nee).

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Greenray Group Team Event, Edinburgh

St Georges day was spent in a sunny Edinburgh for a large contingent of the Greenray Group and their partners.

We hope you enjoy our short film of the event.

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Close to you - What's it all about?

Bacharach Reimagined...

Effortlessly Cool...

A seriously fun evening with Templeton Events...

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What’s the point of Sports Hospitality anyway?

Let’s be honest about things; when a client or a supplier accepts an invitation to spend the day with you at a major sporting event, they are not coming primarily for the pleasure of your company. That is not to say that they do not enjoy your company, but would they leave their family or their workplace to spend a day with you under different, less entertaining circumstances?

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Royal Ascot - Dress Code


 

So another Royal Ascot comes to an end, and not just any Royal Ascot, but one held in the Diamond Jubilee year of Her Majesty The Queen.

 

In many ways, it was arguably the best Royal Ascot ever - not just because of the above, but with the performances of Frankel and Black Caviar, Frankie winning the Gold Cup, and a Royal winner to boot (all of which I am sure you have already witnessed or read about), the racing managed to overshadow the fashion. And it is the latter that I would like to briefly touch upon...

 

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The art of giving back

Is the Art of Giving Back is Good Business Practice... 

Honest and trusting relationships with our clients...
I’m a firm believer in what goes around, comes around. We’ve always tried our best to practise good business karma, and I believe that it has helped us enormously in forging honest and trusting relationships with our clients.

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Wimbledon - Surprise and Certitude

An almost equal measure...

As usual, Wimbledon this year mixed surprises and inevitability in almost equal measure. In the Men’s Championship, Rafa Nadal went out early to the dreadlocked Dustin Brown, although this should not really have been such a shock as Brown had beaten him last year in Germany.

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Royal Ascot - it's horses for courses...

The Fourth Day...

Royal Ascot, Friday 19th June 2015

Friday was the day when Jockey Ryan Moore secured a record-breaking ninth winner at Royal Ascot on Aloft in the Queen's Vase, beating the existing modern day record of eight winners held by Pat Eddery and Lester Piggott.

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A fine sunny afternoon for a VIP private guided group tour of Bletchley Park (where enemy codes were deciphered during World War Two) and the National Museum of Computing (also at Bletchley, and where codes were also deciphered). Confused? You will be... 

 

Don't Help The Enemy!
Image © Bletchley Park Trust
 
The relationship between the two establishments is interesting, and probably best not discussed, as the people who work at both venues are all extremely pleasant and helpful. So, first off was Bletchley Park Codebreakers, where during an earlyafternoon tea in the beautiful mansion, our party was briefed on the history of Bletchley Park, and that of the German Enigma encoding machine, by our guide, the charming and immensely knowledgeable Geoff Snowden.

 

The Bletchley Park Mansion
Image © Bletchley Park Trust

 

Enigma Machine
Image © Bletchley Park Trust 
 
Then it was off on a walk around the various huts of Bletchley Park, for a fascinating explanation of how thousands of young men and women worked in pretty uncomfortable conditions, and under immense pressure, to crack the German coded messages. I won’t even attempt to convey the complexity of what they had to do here, but suffice it to say that the time flew past as Geoff fully held everyone’s attention. We even saw a bombe - not the exploding variety, but an electromechanical device used by cryptographers to decipher the Enigma generated messages.
 

Bombe Electromechanical Device
Image © Bletchley Park Trust 

The group then adjourned to the National Museum of Computing, a few minutes’ walk up the road, for a most welcome ice cold champagne and delicious canapés reception. The tour then commenced under the expert guidance of Andrew Spencer, and the group was introduced to the rebuilt and working Colossus, the world’s first electronic computer. It was designed specifically to help decipher the Lorenz-encrypted messages between Hitler and his High Command, and to appreciate the magnitude of its successful achievement you’ll have to come on the tour itself!

 

WRNS operating Colossus during World War II
Image © Crown. Reproduced by kind permission, Director, GCHQ

 

Lorenz Machine
Image © TNMOC

There was plenty more to see, including a gallery devoted to the development of the PC since the 70s, which had many of the group reminiscing about their childhoods.

 

Alan Turing
Image © Bletchley Park Trust


Alan Turing was one of the most important and original Englishmen of the twentieth century who did more than any other to make possible the breaking of the German Enigma codes at the secret Station X at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire. It was said by Winston Churchill that Turing’s work was the greatest single contribution to victory in the Second World War. It is agreed by historians that the work of the codebreakers shortened the war by at least two years, saving countless lives. Turing is also regarded as the intellectual parent of computer science. He kept his mug chained to a radiator to prevent theft and sometimes cycled cycled to work wearing a gas mask to guard against pollen.

Sculpture by Stephen Kettle

"I believe that at the end of the century, the use of words and general educated opinion will have altered so much that one will be able to speak of machines thinking without expecting to be contradicted”.

Alan Turing

 

The National of Museum of Computing
Image © TNMOC


We are proud and delighted to work with both the Code Breakers Museum and The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park.

Hush! It's a secret...


At the end of the tour, we transferred by mini bus to The Killingworth Castle in Wooton for an evening meal. In its two year history this excellent establishment has already won a Michelin Bib Gourmand and has been named The Oxford Times Restaurant of the Year. As an added bonus, it also serves its own range of craft ales from the Yubberton Brewing Company. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed the meal and refreshments.

 

The Killingworth Castle, Wootton

 

The Killingworth Castle Menu

 

The Killingworth Castle

 

It was then time for the transfer to Woodstock, and overnight accommodation at The Bear hotel. Situated just twenty minutes’ drive from Oxford, this former 13th century coaching inn combines history and culture with modern facilities, all in a tranquil setting.

 

The Bear Hotel, Woodstock

 

The Elizabeth Taylor Suite at The Bear Hotel, Woodstock

 

Wings of all colours from their shoulders grew
From ADCOCK-pink to heavenly LUCAS-blue,
A dazzling sight. On Mrs. EDWARDS' head
There beamed a halo of unearthly red;
STRACHEY'S was black and of stupendous size,
But for extension HINSLEY'S took the prize.


Excerpt from poem "The Other Side" by Patrick Wilkinson (1907-1985), a Vice-Provost of King's College and Horace scholar, who had been part of the Italian Naval Section at Bletchley.


  ...Bletchley Park Bespoke VIP +London 布萊切利園密碼破譯員 II



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